Updated PS3 to PS4 Game Upgrade Program Information

Upgrade

Sony just revealed more information about their plans to allow certain PS3 games to be upgraded to their PS4 versions.  If you purchase the disc version of the supported games you are able to redeem the in box code as soon as you purchase the game.  You can then download the game once you have your PS4.  Unfortunately there is one major drawback, you need to hold on to the PS3 disc, DO NOT trade it in!  Even though the PS4 doesn’t play PS3 games, in order to play the digital PS4 version of the game you need to insert the PS3 game disc into your PS4.

If you decide to go the digital route for both the PS3 and PS4 games all you have to do is pre-order or buy the game on the PS3 and once the PS4 comes out the discounted price will be reflected in the PSN Store.  For more detailed steps on the upgrade program please go to the Sony blog.  For more information about the upgrade program please check out Michael Cwick’s article.

So does this change anybody’s plans on using the upgrade program?  Please respond in the comments below.

Written by Damon Bullis

Damon Bullis

I’m a gamer from back in the days of Telstar Arcade, Atari 2600, and Intellivision. I currently have a PS4, PS3x2, Vita, PSP, Xbox One, 360, Wii U, Wii, and a N64.

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  • http://www.youtube.com/user/Stoffinator2008?gl=CA&hl=en Stoffinator

    I will be using this for sure for BF4.

    • Nick_Light

      Me too. I don’t really understand the problem here. If you buy a disc, you just upgrade and use the same disc. Whether you bought the PS3 version or PS4 version, you still need a disc in the tray. Am I missing something?

      • Jahonius

        Basically, the PS3 Disc running on PS4 will act as a DRM authentication. This is only natural, since a single PS3 disc could be swapped around to give birth to a handful of $10 upgrades.

        The more I see “features” like these, the more I consider to go ALL-DIGITAL, and call me an old-fart, but I will miss the feeling of peeling off the plastic, the “pop” sound that the case makes when I open one, and “schklick” of removing the disc… you know…

        • Damon Bullis

          The only issue is that each PS3 disc version would have only one code to redeem. It does prevent people from selling their PS4 code to somebody else.

          I do agree with you about missing the whole experience of buying a physical game compared to digital, that’s part of the reason I don’t think I could ever go totally digital.

        • http://www.youtube.com/user/Stoffinator2008?gl=CA&hl=en Stoffinator

          I don’t think I will ever go full digital.

      • Damon Bullis

        I was thinking about getting it for BF4 but now I am unsure. The thing I don’t like is having to keep the PS3 disc. Why should I have to hold onto the disc if I want to play it on the PS4. The lack of information of whether it needs to be the same disc or just any disc for that game, disturbs me a little because I have had discs become unreadable. If that happens would I have to buy the game again so I could play it?

        It does make it easier for me if I do this to go digital. I just wish they would release the specs for the HDD so I can order a larger one and have it ready at launch.

  • Keith Dunn

    How very Microsoft of them. THIS could use a 180. But oh well….it won’t affect many games anyway. Just a handful at launch. Still….It seems damned shady.

    • http://www.youtube.com/user/Stoffinator2008?gl=CA&hl=en Stoffinator

      How does it seem shady?

      • Keith Dunn

        Because it denies resale of any of those games. You have to keep the PS3 disc to insert each time you play? What if you don’t wanna play on PS3 anymore? I can see their point, you got the PS4 version deeply discounted because you bought it on PS3…so maybe they think you shouldn’t be able to return the PS3 version which represents the greatest monetary amount of purchase and amounts to having your cake and eating it too.
        Still….it seems like an Xbox One tactic. And Xbox One was shady.
        Also….maybe that was my initial reaction and I had not thought it through. That being said, on the surface it seems shady. They need to explain it better and not just toss the info out like MS did with Xbone.

        • http://www.youtube.com/user/Stoffinator2008?gl=CA&hl=en Stoffinator

          I’m sure its to make sure you can’t share it. I don’t find it a big deal. Least you are getting a pretty big discount. If it is something that bothers you, can always just wait for the next gen version. Not anywhere near as bad as what MS was trying to pull.

  • http://psnation.org/ Josh

    There’s nothing sinister going on here. The whole reason behind the restriction is because people would take advantage of it otherwise.

    Say I didn’t have to keep the PS3 disc in the system to play the PS4 version, what’s to stop me from getting a few friends together, splitting the cost of the PS3 disc and then passing it around so everyone gets a cheap PS4 version of the game. We could pass it around the entire town to anyone who wants it.

    They’re giving us a cheap upgrade path if we want it, but they’re asking that we actually prove that we “own” the game in some way. This is the easiest way.

    Personally, I won’t be taking advantage of this for the simple fact that I want the physical media. If I’m going to upgrade to a PS4 version of a game, I’ll just wait until it drops in price (which they always do) and then buy the disc.

    • Jahonius

      Yeah, me too. I like “holding on to” physical copies, and I guess like you, i could wait for a lot of games to go cheap before I buy them :0

    • Damon Bullis

      I don’t think it is sinister in nature but just an added hassle that didn’t need to be there. While it is nicer than what Xbox is doing, it could have been done differently. Either make it only for those who buy both digitally or figure out a way to tie the purchase of a new copy of a game to our profiles so we can prove once that we bought the game instead of every time we want to play it.

      While this is an extreme example, it’s like asking a person to enter in their iTunes password for each song they want to listen to to prove that they bought it through Apple.